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Recipes - yes food you CUD fool!

Mo Facta

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I think [MENTION=27772]Greg Bester[/MENTION] is going to be very welcome here on Carb, wow. Greg, if I might ask, how's the "mutton" flavour on those shanks? I am a massive lamb fan, but wife...not so much. She hates that overbearing mutton flavour that sometimes comes with a mutton/lamb dish and it only gets worse when I try to "cook it out", for some reason. This sounds wonderful, specially with Christmas coming up, and I might consider it actually!
If you want to lighten the flavour a bit you can use chicken stock. I just use mutton stock because of course it's lamb and I look to intensify the lamb flavour. That being said, you won't even notice the mutton stock because the wine pretty much takes over (I generally use almost a whole bottle) and gives it a savory, slightly sweet rustic flavour after all the alcohol burns off. When you braise meat for long periods of time at a low temp as in this recipe you're actually using the braising liquid and the vegetables therein to imbue the meat with a certain flavour and give it richness. Lamb is by nature fatty so by browning the outside first you're essentially sealing in all of that moisture while the flavour from the liquid slowly soaks in and augments it as it cooks. At the same time, excess fat renders off and joins with the braising liquid and helps to further lock in flavour and produces a perfect base for making gravy with a thickening agent like flour/maizena.

In my experience, you either love lamb or you don't. You can't really get away from the core taste. But when the meat melts off the bone like butter without drying out with the perfect meat to fat ratio and you pair it with the garlic herb mash, it's really difficult to not enjoy it if you're a meat eater. It's just too good!

Cheers :)
 

Mo Facta

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I make my own mushroom sauce, and, well, I don't want to brag, but holy crap it's good! With fillet medallions, flash fried and left to "simmer" in the sauce, wow...
I love fillet medallions!

Because beef fillet is so expensive I sometimes buy pork fillet and cook it whole on the Weber until it gets a nice char on the outside and it's around medium done. Then I slice it thick into medallions and let them rest. People don't usually cook pork medium but 1. they cook further while they rest, 2. I am going to cook them again in a sauce and 3. it keeps them tender beforehand. While they're resting I add thick soy sauce, garlic, a squirt of molasses and brown sugar (honey also works really well) to a frying pan and heat it til it's just bubbling and reduced to a thick sauce. I add the medallions and toss them in the sauce. Done. I generally serve them with al dente stir fry vegetables and steamed spinach topped with caramelised onions. The sweet garlic soy sauce works well over the spinach and onions as well.

Looks something like this (no stir fry veges that that time):

View attachment 75792

Cheers :)
 
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Toxxyc

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Thanks for the tips, appreciated!

In my opinion fillet isn't that expensive at all. I usually buy some stock when it's cheaper - around R160/kg and then I freeze it whole. Fillet is one of the few cuts you can actually freeze in my opinion, since the coarse texture isn't ruined and the meat doesn't get tough at all. Anyway, my mushroom fillet medallions are done like this (and now I have to make nice steps like you or I'll look like a fool):

Ingredients:
About 1kg whole fillet
A drizzle of canola oil
2 tablespoons butter
400g sliced mushrooms (not chopped)
500ml fresh cream
Salt to taste
Black pepper - freshly ground
Flour/maizena for thickening

1. Take a whole fillet, and trim the sinew on the side (the silver skin). I do this with a relatively blunt knife - cut a tiny section off the meat and then "shave" the sinew off in the same way you skin a buck. This results in VERY little meat loss, and you end up with a tiny ball of "mince" on the edge of the knife that I use to test the temperature of the oil in the pan later. When the sinew is trimmed (leave the fat on), cut into medallions. I prefer cutting the fillet slightly sideways, and not 90° against the grain. This results in larger pieces (oval in shape), and a more stringy meat, which I absolutely adore. Cut as you see fit.

2. When the prep is done, take a pan of your choice and heat up canola oil to just before smoking. It should be fiercely hot, but not smoking, and this is why I use canola (it has a much higher burn point). Slap the medallions in the oil and leave them for a minute on each side so that they brown nicely. When they're sealed well, take them off and put them aside.

3. Drastically reduce the heat in the same pan (don't clean it, you want those meat juices in your sauce) and when it's cooled down sufficiently, drop in the butter. The butter should just melt, NEVER bubble. Add your mushrooms ASAP, so that they "soak up" the butter. This will cook out again later.

4. SLOWLY cook the mushrooms until they start to shrink and drump liquid (it happens relatively soon). The trick here is to take your time - fry them REALLY slowly. Too fast and they'll bun, and ruin the sauce.

5. The second they start dumping sauce, pour in the cream, salt and pepper. You should reallly slowly heat up the mixture at this point, and keep stirring. You'll notice that the cream will turn that textbook grey colour of mushroom sauce - that's what you want. Keep stirring until the cream starts steaming.

6. The second the cream starts slowly bubbling from the heating, add the medallions back to the sauce. Cook for as long as you want (until the meat is as well done as you like it).

7. Just before eating, take a little bit of cold milk and whisk a fair bit of maizena into the milk to create a thickening sauce. Drizzle over the pan while stirring to prevent the forming of lumps, and thicken the sauce to the point where you like it.

8. Serve the medallions with the mushroom sauce scooped over them. The REALLY mild flavour of this dish means it goes well with pretty much any red wine on the side as well. I prefer serving with creamed spinach and sweet pumpkin.

Don't have pics sorry :D
 

Mo Facta

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Thanks for the tips, appreciated!

In my opinion fillet isn't that expensive at all. I usually buy some stock when it's cheaper - around R160/kg and then I freeze it whole. Fillet is one of the few cuts you can actually freeze in my opinion, since the coarse texture isn't ruined and the meat doesn't get tough at all. Anyway, my mushroom fillet medallions are done like this (and now I have to make nice steps like you or I'll look like a fool):

Ingredients:
About 1kg whole fillet
A drizzle of canola oil
2 tablespoons butter
400g sliced mushrooms (not chopped)
500ml fresh cream
Salt to taste
Black pepper - freshly ground
Flour/maizena for thickening

1. Take a whole fillet, and trim the sinew on the side (the silver skin). I do this with a relatively blunt knife - cut a tiny section off the meat and then "shave" the sinew off in the same way you skin a buck. This results in VERY little meat loss, and you end up with a tiny ball of "mince" on the edge of the knife that I use to test the temperature of the oil in the pan later. When the sinew is trimmed (leave the fat on), cut into medallions. I prefer cutting the fillet slightly sideways, and not 90° against the grain. This results in larger pieces (oval in shape), and a more stringy meat, which I absolutely adore. Cut as you see fit.

2. When the prep is done, take a pan of your choice and heat up canola oil to just before smoking. It should be fiercely hot, but not smoking, and this is why I use canola (it has a much higher burn point). Slap the medallions in the oil and leave them for a minute on each side so that they brown nicely. When they're sealed well, take them off and put them aside.

3. Drastically reduce the heat in the same pan (don't clean it, you want those meat juices in your sauce) and when it's cooled down sufficiently, drop in the butter. The butter should just melt, NEVER bubble. Add your mushrooms ASAP, so that they "soak up" the butter. This will cook out again later.

4. SLOWLY cook the mushrooms until they start to shrink and drump liquid (it happens relatively soon). The trick here is to take your time - fry them REALLY slowly. Too fast and they'll bun, and ruin the sauce.

5. The second they start dumping sauce, pour in the cream, salt and pepper. You should reallly slowly heat up the mixture at this point, and keep stirring. You'll notice that the cream will turn that textbook grey colour of mushroom sauce - that's what you want. Keep stirring until the cream starts steaming.

6. The second the cream starts slowly bubbling from the heating, add the medallions back to the sauce. Cook for as long as you want (until the meat is as well done as you like it).

7. Just before eating, take a little bit of cold milk and whisk a fair bit of maizena into the milk to create a thickening sauce. Drizzle over the pan while stirring to prevent the forming of lumps, and thicken the sauce to the point where you like it.

8. Serve the medallions with the mushroom sauce scooped over them. The REALLY mild flavour of this dish means it goes well with pretty much any red wine on the side as well. I prefer serving with creamed spinach and sweet pumpkin.

Don't have pics sorry :D
Sounds amazing dude. Thanks for sharing! Damn I love food!

Cheers :)
 

D3TTOL

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Even me!!! I love food! :p
 

Denz1001

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Hwzit carbies

Anyone on carbs tried turducken from checkers, how was it? it is worth the price? any lekker recipes?

thanks...
 

WTFking7SOAP

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2 tbls peanut butter
2 tbls self-rasing flour (pancake mix)
2 tbls milk

mix in mug and nuke for 60s on high.
serve with creme fresh, icecream, or double cream yogurt (my fav)
What type of peanut butter would you prefer bud? This sounds nice xD and by high you mean speed wise? Is it just to mix everything? I'm a complete noob when it comes to things like this. Even simple things >.>
 
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gmhaynes

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This is a Jamie Oliver recipe that wins, every time...
Crispy and Sticky Chicken Thighs with Squashed New Potatoes and Tomatoes

1529142156079.png


Ingredients
  • 1 3/4 pounds new potatoes, scrubbed
  • 12 boned chicken thighs, skin on, preferably free-range or organic
  • Olive oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 1/4 pounds cherry tomatoes, different shapes and colors if you can find them
  • 1 bunch fresh oregano, leaves picked
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Red wine vinegar

Directions
Put the potatoes into a large saucepan of salted boiling water and boil until cooked.
While the potatoes are cooking, preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. Cut each chicken thigh into 3 strips and place in a bowl. Rub the meat all over with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper, then toss.
Heat a large frying pan, big enough to hold all the chicken pieces snugly in 1 layer, and put the chicken into the pan, skin side down. If you don't have a pan that's big enough, feel free to cook the chicken in 2 batches. Toss and fry over a high heat for 10 minutes or so, until almost cooked, then remove with a slotted spoon to an ovenproof pan or dish.
Prick the tomatoes with a sharp knife. Place them in a bowl, cover with boiling water and leave for a minute or so. Drain and, when cool enough to handle, pinch off their skins. You don't have to, but by doing this they will become lovely and sweet when cooked, and their intense flavor will infuse the potatoes. By now the potatoes will be cooked. Drain them in a colander and lightly crush them by pushing down on them with your thumb.
Bash up most of the oregano leaves with a pinch of salt in a pestle and mortar, or a Flavor Shaker if you have one. Add 4 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil, a good splash of red wine vinegar and some pepper and give everything another bash. Add to the chicken with the potatoes, the tomatoes and the rest of the oregano leaves. Toss everything together carefully. Spread out in a single layer in an appropriately sized roasting pan, and bake for 40 minutes in the preheated oven until golden.
Lovely served with an arugula salad dressed with some lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil, and a nice glass of white wine.
 

UnBreakable_D

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easiest soft boiled eggs since it seems to be something nobody knows how to make.
small pot with boiled water in it about 1.5cm over the height of where the eggs would lie.
put on medium heat until the water is simmering
put a timer on for 7 minutes and using a spoon add the eggs so they dont crack.
at 7 minutes take them off the stove run them under cold water until they cooled.perfect every time.
You may need to adjust 30 sec up or down depending on out of the fridge or stored outside eggs and your stove temps.
 

UnBreakable_D

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Depending on how hungry you are, 1 - 2 steaks per person.

Rump or porterhouse steak
Ground Pepper
Course Salt in a grinder (just tastes better than fine salt)
Unsalted Butter(not margarine)
Thinly sliced Fox and Crow mature cheese (If you're a cheapskate, those individually sealed sandwich cheese slices will work too)

Pour a thin layer of olive oil into a non stick pan heat pan to medium heat. Normal 6 level stove plate set to level 4
Grind salt and pepper over both sides of the steak, leave it for 30 seconds before you turn it around so the salt sticks to the steak
slip them into the oil, let them fry for around 2.5 minutes per side(will turn out medium) 1 minute more for medium well, 1 minute less for medium rare
once you turn, drop 50ml butter into the oil and drape the steak as it cooks with the butter
turn once more, drape quickly in the butter and remove it from the pan
Place in a plate and lay two slices of cheese over each steak, let it sit for around a minute or two so it's own heat melts the cheese.

Enjoy
quick tip to add on , always cook the steaks at room temp if you cook them straight out of the fridge at 2.5 min per side it will be medium rare at less than that it will pretty much be rare steak.
 

Skottelgoed Spons

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Kickass (and actually quite easy) flapjacks:

500ml Flour
125ml Sugar
250ml Milk
20ml Baking Powder
2.5ml Salt
2 Eggs

1. Whisk it all until all lumps are gone.

2. Heat a Spray-And-Cook-sprayed pan on a stove. Not too hot at all, mind you. My stove goes to a number 8 and I found that halfway between 2 and 3 is the best setting.

3. Scoop blobs of the batter into the pan and follow the same baking procedure as with pancakes. They should be golden brown when flipped.

4. Enjoy with butter/syrup/cheese/jams. Keep a stick nearby to beat off people who want to steal it.

I thank you sir for this. Made my batch yesterday to bake tonight. Just a question. How many do you get out of this batch?
 

joostebenjamin1

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Has anyone got a recipe for high calories food that I can take as lunch to school (anything) and breakfast, dinner? I need to bulk up
 

Endzeit

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This one is difficult so please keep up guys, Its also probably the most dangerous recipe in the world.
Ingredients needed:
2L of Klipdrift
2 Bags of Ice
8L Of coke
And finally 1 Girlfriend/wife

So first take a glass and add ice until halfway full,
Then take brandy and pour slowly until 33% full
Full the rest with coke (be careful as this might boil over if done incorrectly)
Drink until empty then rinse and repeat
Do this for the next 5 to 6 hours or until there is no more brandy.

Now here comes the hard part, walk to the fridge while avoiding eye contact with the wife/gf
Violently fling the fridge door open and look for something to eat (even if there is something to eat, leave it)
Slam the fridge door shut and go sit in the lounge, after about 2-3 minutes of waiting carefully shout the following words;
WOMAN, MAKE ME A SANDWICH NOW!!!
 

Bloodrayne_ZA

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Protein Packed Energy Bites

Ingredients:

1 cup mixed nuts (such as pecans, walnuts, cashews, almonds, etc.)
1 cup rolled oats
2 tsp Robertsons Pure Moringa Powder
½ cup raisins (OR dried cranberries)
Pinch of Robertsons ground nutmeg
2 tbsp chia seeds
½ cup peanut butter (OR alternative nut butter)
¼ cup honey
1 tsp vanilla essence
1 cup dark baking chocolate

Method:

1. In the bowl of a large food processor, pulse the nuts until finely ground (but stop before they start turning to nut butter).

2. Add the rolled oats, Robertsons Pure Moringa Powder, raisins, ground nutmeg and chia seeds to the nuts; pulse five (1-second) pulses to combine. Add the peanut butter, honey, and vanilla to the mixture; pulse until all of the ingredients are well blended, scraping the sides of the bowl as necessary.

3. Melt the dark baking chocolate and drizzle into the ice cube tray, swirling to ensure the sides of each hole are well coated with chocolate.

4. Freeze for 10 minutes.

5. Fill each hole with the oat mixture and press down to remove any air bubbles.

6. Top with a little extra dark baking chocolate and freeze for 1 hour.

7. Pop the bites out of the ice cube tray.

8. Store the left over bites in a re-sealable bag in the fridge. ENJOY!
https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/aea07a_274c272b0ec147668cb70f48e4f0006f.pdf
 

souljazk

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