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Recipes - yes food you CUD fool!

Presler

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Depending on how hungry you are, 1 - 2 steaks per person.

Rump or porterhouse steak
Ground Pepper
Course Salt in a grinder (just tastes better than fine salt)
Unsalted Butter(not margarine)
Thinly sliced Fox and Crow mature cheese (If you're a cheapskate, those individually sealed sandwich cheese slices will work too)

Pour a thin layer of olive oil into a non stick pan heat pan to medium heat. Normal 6 level stove plate set to level 4
Grind salt and pepper over both sides of the steak, leave it for 30 seconds before you turn it around so the salt sticks to the steak
slip them into the oil, let them fry for around 2.5 minutes per side(will turn out medium) 1 minute more for medium well, 1 minute less for medium rare
once you turn, drop 50ml butter into the oil and drape the steak as it cooks with the butter
turn once more, drape quickly in the butter and remove it from the pan
Place in a plate and lay two slices of cheese over each steak, let it sit for around a minute or two so it's own heat melts the cheese.

Enjoy
 

Leader0fr4tz

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Some nice ones here but i stick to old school for a quick dinner.

Peel 3-4 tomatoes and cut in quaters
Peel and slice 1-2 onions(depending on size)
Put butter in a pot on the stove and let it melt, add tomatoes and onions.
Cook until onions and soft and tomatoes are a pulp

Make pap (if you don't know how find out)

Fry 2-3 eggs

Dish up pap, pour tomato & onion sauce over it, put eggs on top.

Brealfast lunch and supper of plaas kinders everywhere.

I have loads of other meals that i love (i love variety) but that is quick and easy


Sent from my E2303 using Tapatalk
 

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So I did this last night. It's a Gordon Ramsay method, if I remember correctly:

Step 1: Thick cut piece of steak. I used rump. Tie a piece of string around the steak to “squeeze” it together. Sprinkle with a little bit of salt and give it a good, thick crust of freshly ground black pepper. On both sides.
Tied and spiced:


Step 2: Place in a baking tray with a dribble of oil on the underside. Please ignore the other, smaller, thinner pieces of steak. They’re for SWAMBO. Place in the oven, uncovered, at 160°C for 30-45 minutes, depending on the thickness of the steak. Mine was in too long, I know, but unforseen circumstances was to blame.
In baking tray, ready for the oven:

Just out of the oven:

Step 3: Remove from baking tray and sit down to rest for 5-10 minutes.
Resting:

Step 4: Heat up some canola oil in a pan until VERY hot. It should almost start smoking when you know it’s ready. Flash-fry the steak for around 2-3 minutes per side, depending on how crispy you’d like the crust. In the last 20-30 seconds of the frying, drop a teaspoon of butter in the pan and let it brown up the steak properly.
Superhot pan:

Step 5: Remove the steak from the pan and cut into strips. Pour the butter from the pan over the slices and, believe me, enjoy!
Cut into strips, flash makes it look less pink than it actually is:

Strips again:

Without flash to show the pinkness that’s still there (but I could have made it more pink, I know):



So yeah. That's how I'm doing steak from now on.
 

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And this is the way I make fish when I feel like spending a ton of money on fresh kingklip:

Step 1: Buy fresh kingklip fillets. Frozen really, really doesn’t work – the fish loses its tenderness and becomes a little bit rubbery. Vacuum packed also has its downside – the fish smells strongly of, well, fish. Fresh costs very similar to frozen to begin with, so I rarely buy premium fish frozen.
Step 2: Fry the fish in butter. Use a lot of butter, you’re going to need it later. I used about 100gr here:


Step 3: Once the butter is melted give the fish a minute or two on each side, just to “seal” in the butter. Then, pour over 250ml fresh cream. Add a pinch of salt (you don’t want it too salty, about half a teaspoon is fine for a 500gr piece of fish), a pinch of Aromat (again about half a teaspoon) and black pepper to taste (you can put as much as you want, but if you’re not a pepper lover just use a little bit). Add lemon juice. I’m not giving amounts, because it depends entirely on your taste. I like my sauce nice and sour, so I add quite a bit. Add in small amounts and taste as you go along. Once you’ve put too much, you can’t go back, so rather go slow. You have the time. Sauciness added:


Step 4: Leave to simmer until the fish is done. Sprinkle a little bit of flour over the sauce and mix it in until you get the desired thickness of your sauce. You’ll notice the edges of the thin side of the fillet will start curling up, and then you know it is done. Don’t overcook, or the fish starts becoming tough. It should start looking like this near the end of the cooking time:


Step 5: Serve. It can be served with rice or chips, or, like I did because I didn’t have either on hand, just like that with some fresh fruit salad on the side. Amazing dish, easy to make and almost impossible to mess up. Fish flakes apart easily and soaks up the creamy sour sauce. It’s awesome:


PS: You can add garlic as well if you want, but my wife doesn’t enjoy garlic as much as I do so I just omit it from the recipe. If you want you can add a chopped clove or three, and I’m sure it’ll be a sauce suited well for other seafood such as shrimp, mussels and calamari as well. Just ensure you don’t cook the calamari in the sauce or it’ll go rubbery. Calamari needs to be flash fried, always. Super-high heat for a short period of time.
Anyway, try it. It’s awesome!
 

ScorpioMan86

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So I did this last night. It's a Gordon Ramsay method, if I remember correctly:

Step 1: Thick cut piece of steak. I used rump. Tie a piece of string around the steak to “squeeze” it together. Sprinkle with a little bit of salt and give it a good, thick crust of freshly ground black pepper. On both sides.
Tied and spiced:


Step 2: Place in a baking tray with a dribble of oil on the underside. Please ignore the other, smaller, thinner pieces of steak. They’re for SWAMBO. Place in the oven, uncovered, at 160°C for 30-45 minutes, depending on the thickness of the steak. Mine was in too long, I know, but unforseen circumstances was to blame.
In baking tray, ready for the oven:

Just out of the oven:

Step 3: Remove from baking tray and sit down to rest for 5-10 minutes.
Resting:

Step 4: Heat up some canola oil in a pan until VERY hot. It should almost start smoking when you know it’s ready. Flash-fry the steak for around 2-3 minutes per side, depending on how crispy you’d like the crust. In the last 20-30 seconds of the frying, drop a teaspoon of butter in the pan and let it brown up the steak properly.
Superhot pan:

Step 5: Remove the steak from the pan and cut into strips. Pour the butter from the pan over the slices and, believe me, enjoy!
Cut into strips, flash makes it look less pink than it actually is:

Strips again:

Without flash to show the pinkness that’s still there (but I could have made it more pink, I know):



So yeah. That's how I'm doing steak from now on.
Food, Glorious Food!!! - M so hungry now
 

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Okay imma show y'all how to make THE best butternut soup in existence.

1) Chop up around 1kg of butternut. It sucks I know, no shame in buying pre-cut.
2) Slice up 2 yellow onions. Get yourself a nice big pan and fry them on a medium high heat in 2tbsp butter. When they start to caramelize add the butternut. Salt liberally.
3) Turn down the temperature to medium low (a 3 on my hob) and let it all sautee together for around 15 minutes. The butternut should start to blacken slightly around the outside, and become fully softened on the inside. Add 3 tbsp of honey.
4) Add 4 cups of chicken stock. If you don't have the real stuff I guess it's okay to use Ina Paarman sachets, but for the love of all that's holy and good don't use powdered stock.
5) Bring heat up to 5 and simmer for 5 minutes
6) When the butternut is softened through, it's ready. Add the following: 1/2 cup cream, plenty of salt and pepper, 1/2tsp crushed cloves, 1tsp cinnamon, 1/2tsp nutmeg, 1tsp thyme. Blend till all lumps are gone.
7) Serve with fresh rolls.

 

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Aaaaaand my seafood as promised (I think):

Step 1: Buy seafood. Don’t buy a “seafood mix”, that stuff’s only for stews or when you’re going to make a paella or something. I buy my seafood in Centurion from a shop called Bazaruto. They sell seafood both fresh and frozen imported from Mozambique. Prices are generally excellent, considering the quality you get. I got 1kg of prawns and 400gr calamari rings (for two people).
These are the prawns (one of two packs). LM Prawns, medium sized, bought frozen and deveined:

Ingredients I used (crushed garlic not in picture):


Step 2: Prepare your calamari. I bought frozen rings. Calamari freezes well, but they have to defrost slowly. I let these defrost in the fridge over ~30 hours. After defrosting I dried them on a towel. After that I mixed some flour, a little bit of coarse salt, a generous helping of black pepper, a good shake of crushed garlic and a sprinkle of Aromat. Dip the rings in beat(en?) eggs and shake off excess, and coat them properly in the flour mix. Pack them on a flat tray without the rings touching each other, sit them aside and let them stand for a bit. I let mine stand for about 3 hours in the fridge. This lets the egg bind with the flour to form a really sticky dough that won’t come off the rings. Before frying I added some plain flour to the plate and just shook them around a bit to get them properly coated again, as the egg and moisture of the calamari comes though the flour and gets sticky. It should looks something like this:
Calamari rings coated:


Step 3: Start your sauce. On low heat, melt a good dollop of butter in a small saucepan. It takes a while to melt (on my stove at 1-2 setting, anyway), so continue your business while this is happening.
Butter in pan:


Step 4: Take a large pan (larger the better, it goes quicker) and heat up some butter over medium heat. Too hot will burn the prawns and make the meat tough (experience talking here). When they’re placed in the pan, grind some coarse salt (only a little bit) and a good dash of freshly ground black pepper over the prawns. Let them fry in the butter for about 90 seconds on one side, and then flip them over. When they’re flipped over, squirt a little bit of lemon juice over them to make some moisture in the pan. This allows the prawns to cook a bit higher up from the pan and makes them tender They’re done when the prawns turn pink (noticeable change in colour) and their tails start curling.
Heating butter in pan for prawns:

Prawns placed in butter:

Prawns turned, lemon juice squirted. When the prawns look like this, you should be removing them, not taking pictures :p:


Step 5: While the prawns are cooking, you can complete your sauce in bits. In the melted butter, pour 250ml fresh cream, add salt and pepper to taste, a sprinkle of Aromat and slowly add lemon juice until you get to the taste you desire. This varies wildly from person to person, so do as you please. Mix in some flour to thicken and DO NOT overcook. Once the sauce starts slowly bubbling, remove from heat and place aside. You’ll heat it right before use if needed again.
Sauce ready:


Step 6: When the prawns are done, place them in a dish or on a plate and keep them warm. Not too hot though, or they’ll get tough. In a little deeper pan or pot, heat some sunflower oil to very hot (approaching smoking hot). Drop the calamari rings in the oil with a skewer (works very lekker) and fry them for about 60~90 seconds. Anything longer and the calamari gets rubbery and unedible. They might turn brown or they might not, but they should be very crispy by the time they’re removed. Trust me on this, DO NOT OVERCOOK THE CALAMARI. 90 seconds it plenty of time, and if it’s less it’s even better. Calamari rings cook in hot water in around 30 seconds, so really, don’t be scared that they’ll be raw when eaten, because they won’t. The coating protects it a bit, which is why you’re frying them a bit longer. Fry them in batches, and don’t add too many to the oil at once or the oil will get too cold. Place them on paper towels to drain some of the oil when done.
Calamari frying:


Step 7: Compile all you’ve made together. You should start eating as soon as absolutely possible after the calamari is done, as the rings get tough if you leave them too long. My pile of prawns looked awesome...
Prawns done:


Step 8: Enjoy. Holy crap enjoy. I scooped the sauce over the prawns and dished the rings and prawns up with some pan-friend potato and onion squares, which was epic. This is better than Ocean Basket seafood and reminds me a lot of Crawdaddy’s quality. I seriously doubt I’ll be buying seafood in a restaurant anytime soon, seeing as this cost less overall than about half this food would cost in a restaurant. Highly, highly recommended.
End result:
 

Presler

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When you buy takeaways or get room service at the hotel, those little salt/pepper/spice packets come with. KFC chilly salt is my favourite.

Collect them over time, then eventually mix them all up into an old spice bottle. No mix is ever exactly the same, so it's like every time you try out a new spice mix.

Good for braai, french fries and all sort of other goodies that needs a regular change to, well, Spice things up. :)
 

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A friend asked for this recipe I concocted so I thought I'd share it here...

Choc-chip Tiramisu

Ingredients:
6-8 Choc chip muffins
150ml Very strong coffee
60ml Coffee tequila (or tia maria or kahlua etc)
250g Marscapone
500ml Whipping Cream
6T Raw sugar
1t Vanilla powder/extract/essence
2T Cocoa powder (Dutched)
1 Flake or Crumbling chocolate

Method:
Mix the coffee and liquor together - allow to cool.
Mix the Marscapone, cream, raw sugar, vanilla and 1/4 of the coffee/liquor in a glass bowl until thick (stiff peaks).
Grease or spray a large glass/ceramic serving dish.
Cut and lay half the choc chip muffins to cover the bottom of the dish.
Spoon 1/2 the remainder of the coffee/liquor mixture evenly over the muffin base.
Cover entirely with half of the cream mixture.
Lay the remainder of the choc chip muffins and spoon the remainder of the coffee/liquor mixture over.
Cover with the remainder of the cream mixture.
Dust the cocoa powder on top.
Crumble the chocolate on top.
Refridgerate for at least 12 hours.
Remove from fridge and insert face into serving dish and move jaw up and down repeatedly. Swallow as necessary.
 

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Kickass (and actually quite easy) flapjacks:

500ml Flour
125ml Sugar
250ml Milk
20ml Baking Powder
2.5ml Salt
2 Eggs

1. Whisk it all until all lumps are gone.

2. Heat a Spray-And-Cook-sprayed pan on a stove. Not too hot at all, mind you. My stove goes to a number 8 and I found that halfway between 2 and 3 is the best setting.

3. Scoop blobs of the batter into the pan and follow the same baking procedure as with pancakes. They should be golden brown when flipped.

4. Enjoy with butter/syrup/cheese/jams. Keep a stick nearby to beat off people who want to steal it.

 

Reap3r

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Kickass (and actually quite easy) flapjacks:

500ml Flour
125ml Sugar
250ml Milk
20ml Baking Powder
2.5ml Salt
2 Eggs

You can make a lot of things with this base recipe, I like it.
 

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You can make a lot of things with this base recipe, I like it.
Yes true, I forgot to add that this recipe also works for waffles, and by reducing the sugar you can make savoury waffles with it as well (add the same toppings as on pizza and bake it in the oven). If you don't have a waffle iron, mimic the above description but just use a grill pan. The ridges in the pan simulate the holes and stuff on a waffle and works very well.
 

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Tried the following over the weekend.
4 x deboned chicken breasts
250g streaky bacon
cheddar, feta and mozzorela cheese grated

Cut the chicken breasts in halves. Add your cheeses on top and roll up. wrap the streaky bacon around to seal the cheese.

Either cook over the braai or in a rotissori for about 45mins.
 

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When I was on Tinder slaying tarts I used to cook this for them on the first dinner date at my place and, erm, you know, mattress gymnastics was pretty much a sure thing (I had a bit of a slut phase after I got divorced). You make this right and both sexes will be trying to get in your pants regardless of sexual orientation. This is my own recipe adapted from others throughout the years.

Slow braised French-style lamb shanks


Ingredients

2 x lamb shanks (+/- 1KG)
1 1/2 x onions, chopped
3 x large carrots, peeled and chopped
3 x large stalks of celery, thick chopped
3 x cloves fresh garlic, chopped (or 1 tablespoon chopped garlic from tub)
800ml mutton stock (cube or fresh, fresh is best for flavour, stock substitutes for salt so make the stock as strong as your taste for salt)
1 x sprig fresh thyme, 1 x sprig fresh rosemary, 1 x sprig fresh marjoram tied together into a bouquet garni with twine
3 x bay leaves
1 bottle wine (merlot or shiraz works best, the better the wine, the better the taste)
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil (or sunflower oil)

Method

Preheat oven to 150 degrees Celsius. Heat the olive oil in a large heavy cast iron pot (suitable for braising in the oven - I used a 30cm flat bottomed dutch oven) over high heat and brown the lamb shanks on all sides. The oil needs to be very hot for this and you want to keep an eye on the shanks to make sure they brown nicely on the outside without burning them. This includes the thick bottom portion of the shank. You may need to add more oil as the process goes on. Remove the shanks and set them aside. Turn the heat down to med-high. Add the chopped onions and cook them until they are soft and transparent. Add the carrots and celery and put the lid on for them to sweat for about five minutes. Add the garlic and stir the vegetables around, making sure the garlic does not burn - this will ruin it's flavour and make it bitter. Put the lamb shanks back in the pot on top of the vegetables, thick side down so they are standing up. Add the mutton stock until the vegetables are covered by about 1 inch. Add the wine until the meat portion of the shanks are almost fully covered and the thin shank bones are sticking out of the liquid. Add the bouquet garni to the liquid, gently pushing it just below the surface, and the bay leaves.

Put the lid on the pot, remove from the stove top and place it in the oven.

Cook for 3 to 3 1/2 hours, checking after 3 hours. The rule of thumb here is that the longer you cook it, the more tender it will be. You may need to adjust the oven temp lower if you plan to cook them over 4 hours. Around 135 should do it. The meat should be dark, almost purple from the wine, extremely tender and fall off the bone with little effort.

Serve with garlic, butter and parsley mash potatoes blended with cream. A French salad on the side will also contrast the relative heaviness of the dish.

Cheers :)

PS. The braising liquid can be strained, thickened with flour and used as a gravy.
 
Last edited:

D3TTOL

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Epic!

Ingredients and precise instructions.
I will give this a shot.
I like cooking though it's probably one of those "Things you like but not necessarily good at" though I'd like to think I'm better than average :p
 

Mo Facta

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Epic!

Ingredients and precise instructions.
I will give this a shot.
I like cooking though it's probably one of those "Things you like but not necessarily good at" though I'd like to think I'm better than average :p
Glad you approve!

Cooking is my zen. I love it so much. I am going to start writing a cookbook for divorced single men in Dec called simply "Men Can Cook" that will include recipes like this one. I have ton of recipes I've adapted over the years that I want to share in an irreverent, tongue-in-cheek cookbook aimed at guys like me that found cooking later in life during a miserable marriage and a jubilant divorce and grew to love it.

This recipe is actually very simple and if there's anything that's going to blow the socks off someone you love, this is it. It is yet to disappoint.

Enjoy!

Cheers :)
 

D3TTOL

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Glad you approve!

Cooking is my zen. I love it so much. I am going to start writing a cookbook for divorced single men in Dec called simply "Men Can Cook" that will include recipes like this one. I have ton of recipes I've adapted over the years that I want to share in an irreverent, tongue-in-cheek cookbook aimed at guys like me that found cooking later in life during a miserable marriage and a jubilant divorce and grew to love it.

This recipe is actually very simple and if there's anything that's going to blow the socks off someone you love, this is it. It is yet to disappoint.

Enjoy!

Cheers :)
If your cookbook is going to be anything like what you posted here then I'll grab it.
Always looking for more of a homemade/personal recipes.

The only thing I can sort of call my own are steak recipes.
The HillBilly steak - I tried to copy a restaurant's dish. Steak with egg,Bacon,cheese and Guacamole
Pepper steak - Make my own pepper sauce
Steaks are almost always grilled.

My fiance makes a very nice Honey roast chicken with Potatoes. I make a light gravy from the drippings and OMG the epicness is epic. though it's quite hit or miss when she cooks :p
 

Toxxyc

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I think [MENTION=27772]Greg Bester[/MENTION] is going to be very welcome here on Carb, wow. Greg, if I might ask, how's the "mutton" flavour on those shanks? I am a massive lamb fan, but wife...not so much. She hates that overbearing mutton flavour that sometimes comes with a mutton/lamb dish and it only gets worse when I try to "cook it out", for some reason. This sounds wonderful, specially with Christmas coming up, and I might consider it actually!
 

Toxxyc

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If your cookbook is going to be anything like what you posted here then I'll grab it.
Always looking for more of a homemade/personal recipes.

The only thing I can sort of call my own are steak recipes.
The HillBilly steak - I tried to copy a restaurant's dish. Steak with egg,Bacon,cheese and Guacamole
Pepper steak - Make my own pepper sauce
Steaks are almost always grilled.

My fiance makes a very nice Honey roast chicken with Potatoes. I make a light gravy from the drippings and OMG the epicness is epic. though it's quite hit or miss when she cooks :p
I make my own mushroom sauce, and, well, I don't want to brag, but holy crap it's good! With fillet medallions, flash fried and left to "simmer" in the sauce, wow...
 

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