What's new
Carbonite

Welcome to Carbonite! Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Moving to Web Dev - Should I be using Linux?

iamgigglz

Has a Legendary Member
VIP Supporter
Rating - 100%
218   0   0
Joined
Aug 19, 2014
Messages
5,140
Reaction score
933
Points
3,565
Location
Parkhurst
I've been a .Net dev for ever but I need to learn some web dev, specifically Angular.

I've been messing around with an Ubuntu VM with the idea of moving my Plex server to it, and I quite like it.

Would there be any particular benefit to me basing my Angular dev work in Ubuntu (or some other distro) rather than Windows?

The catch is I'm working with two other devs who use Windows exclusively. Would that cause issues?
 

Psynosaur

Psynosaurus rex
VIP Supporter
Rating - 100%
40   0   0
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
421
Reaction score
47
Points
1,685
Age
33
Location
Durbanville
High

I would always promote moving things to Linux, so do that in you spare time, you would always learn a bunch, but for your current needs, you could base you Angular app on .Net Core 3.1.

The template in VS would get you up and running asap and its cross platform :)

Huzzah
 
Last edited:

no?

A child
VIP Supporter
Rating - 100%
36   0   0
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
1,011
Reaction score
473
Points
2,435
Location
East London
Nah, use what you're comfortable with. If you come across something that doesn't have a windows port you can always try WSL or a vm.
 

borisxp

New Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Points
85
Age
28
Location
Cape Town
agree, stick with what you are comfortable. and since you are collaborating with others, I recommend all using the same OS. saying that, I would always recommend Linux for everything though (if you have the time and patience to learn it on the go)
 

Jedd

Well-Known member
Rating - 100%
8   0   0
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Messages
155
Reaction score
25
Points
1,235
I would suggest sticking with Windows especially if that's what you're comfortable and matches the environment of your coworkers.
Mac is great if you want something similar to linux and you can afford it.

In the long run, a switch to linux would be beneficial since most of the code that you deploy will eventually run in a linux environment
 

iamgigglz

Has a Legendary Member
VIP Supporter
Rating - 100%
218   0   0
Joined
Aug 19, 2014
Messages
5,140
Reaction score
933
Points
3,565
Location
Parkhurst
In the long run, a switch to linux would be beneficial since most of the code that you deploy will eventually run in a linux environment
Curious about this statement. Do you mean when the zombies come and Windows won’t run on what’s left?
Or is it just a case of that peace of mind knowing it’ll run on anything?
 

Jedd

Well-Known member
Rating - 100%
8   0   0
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Messages
155
Reaction score
25
Points
1,235
Curious about this statement. Do you mean when the zombies come and Windows won’t run on what’s left?
Or is it just a case of that peace of mind knowing it’ll run on anything?
It depends a lot on what kind of development work you do, but most of my work ends up on an AWS EC2 instance which, due to price and reliability, is almost always some linux variant. Bash is more powerful and most server scripts will be written using it, ideally, you want access to the same scripting environment on your pc. You want to be sure that whatever works in your development environment is going to behave the exact same way in deployment. Obviously this won't apply if you lean towards windows servers...
 

iamgigglz

Has a Legendary Member
VIP Supporter
Rating - 100%
218   0   0
Joined
Aug 19, 2014
Messages
5,140
Reaction score
933
Points
3,565
Location
Parkhurst
It depends a lot on what kind of development work you do, but most of my work ends up on an AWS EC2 instance which, due to price and reliability, is almost always some linux variant. Bash is more powerful and most server scripts will be written using it, ideally, you want access to the same scripting environment on your pc. You want to be sure that whatever works in your development environment is going to behave the exact same way in deployment. Obviously this won't apply if you lean towards windows servers...
Aah ok. At the moment we're running Windows server environments hosted in JHB and they suck.
I'm trying to convince the guys at the top that AWS is the way to go, especially considering we're about to start dev on a solution for a company in Morocco...

Thanks for your input.
 

Mike

Well-Known member
Rating - 100%
46   0   0
Joined
Apr 23, 2010
Messages
850
Reaction score
19
Points
1,585
Age
30
Location
Pretoria
I had massive driver issues with most flavours of Linux - couldn't get things working nicely on Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mint, Manjaro or Arch. I am happy as a clam on W10 with WSL2 though, nowhere near as much trouble - better performance in 90% of tasks, adobe suite for when I need it and while things aren't as configurable, loads of bonus QoL things.

That said, if you don't have some non-standard gaming laptop like I do, or you don't care about things like screen tearing, lockups, Bluetooth or wifi, Ubuntu does have less of a learning curve for most devvy things. I had to change some stuff to get cron jobs working properly, had to understand ssh a little better to make sure my keys were being passed through correctly etc. I also miss my Pomodoro timer widget.

Also if your colleagues are working on windows, depending on the ide and source control, make sure to understand how line breaks are handled. Never thought that'd be something I'd have to pay attention to, but we have Windows, Linux and Mac machines touching the codebase.
 

dalion619

Lurker
Rating - 100%
41   0   0
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
577
Reaction score
224
Points
1,335
Location
Villieria, Pretoria
Aah ok. At the moment we're running Windows server environments hosted in JHB and they suck.
I'm trying to convince the guys at the top that AWS is the way to go, especially considering we're about to start dev on a solution for a company in Morocco...

Thanks for your input.
I’m curious why not Azure considering your tech stack and I assume you would be paying in Rands.
 

Jedd

Well-Known member
Rating - 100%
8   0   0
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Messages
155
Reaction score
25
Points
1,235
I had massive driver issues with most flavours of Linux - couldn't get things working nicely on Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mint, Manjaro or Arch. I am happy as a clam on W10 with WSL2 though, nowhere near as much trouble - better performance in 90% of tasks, adobe suite for when I need it and while things aren't as configurable, loads of bonus QoL things.

That said, if you don't have some non-standard gaming laptop like I do, or you don't care about things like screen tearing, lockups, Bluetooth or wifi, Ubuntu does have less of a learning curve for most devvy things. I had to change some stuff to get cron jobs working properly, had to understand ssh a little better to make sure my keys were being passed through correctly etc. I also miss my Pomodoro timer widget.

Also if your colleagues are working on windows, depending on the ide and source control, make sure to understand how line breaks are handled. Never thought that'd be something I'd have to pay attention to, but we have Windows, Linux and Mac machines touching the codebase.
This is generally why I recommend mac if you can afford it, you get a unix-like environment but with perfect hardware support and compatibility.
 

Mike

Well-Known member
Rating - 100%
46   0   0
Joined
Apr 23, 2010
Messages
850
Reaction score
19
Points
1,585
Age
30
Location
Pretoria
This is generally why I recommend mac if you can afford it, you get a unix-like environment but with perfect hardware support and compatibility.
Agreed. That said, I do feel as though my current setup gives me the best of both. Better value than mac, some good gpu power, 144hz screen, access to a terminal with zsh. That said, you definitely need to be familiar with networking, VMs and Linux to really make decent use of WSL - it's not as easy as using Unix natively.
 

Top Donors

$260.00
$225.00
$210.00
$113.00
Top